Pour kettle and let steep the gods of tea. @newsblur is my caffeine baby.
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Support kottke.org with a membership

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Hello! Jason Kottke here. If you’re a regular reader of this RSS feed, please consider supporting my efforts on kottke.org by becoming a member today. The revenue from memberships is critical to keeping one of the best independent websites running at its full capacity. There are several membership options to choose from; you can check them out here or read about why I’m doing this here.

And if you’re already a member, thank you! You are the best.

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samuel
11 days ago
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Kottke's cream of the crop. I'm proud to be a kottke.org member.
The Haight in San Francisco
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Eat24 Is Now Delivering Via Robot In The Mission And Potrero

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Eat24 Is Now Delivering Via Robot In The Mission And Potrero Another service has officially entered the fray to make us put up with their delivery bots on our sidewalks, and that's Yelp's Eat24. [ more › ]
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samuel
11 days ago
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Well this is new.
The Haight in San Francisco
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1 public comment
duerig
11 days ago
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Hmm. This is something that hadn't occurred to me. The deliberately snarky 'put up with their delivery bots on our sidewalks' points to an aspect of self-driving cars/drones/etc. that will be a real concern: space pollution. Previously, there was a natural limit to how much public space you could take up. You are only one person after all. And if anybody was annoyed that you (or you in your car) was causing congestion with your presence, then at least they were in the same boat causing just as much congestion. So there has been no fee for congesting public thoroughfares or if there is one, it is more of a flat fee that everyone who has a car pays. But in 10 or 20 years, some people and businesses will be causing a lot more congestion than others. Like the Fedex or UPS trucks that sometimes block traffic but much more prolific.

3 Things You Think Can't Be Fixed in Your Rental Kitchen (But They Can!)

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Every time I check out a rental apartment, I take a deep breath before stepping into the kitchen. You never know what you're going to find, but old cabinets, outdated appliances and dingy backsplashes are likely awaiting. Even if this isn't your "forever home," you don't have to live with these eyesores. Here are some smart (read: completely temporary) ways to deal with the top three rental kitchen problem spots.

READ MORE »

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samuel
13 days ago
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These are all great ideas.
The Haight in San Francisco
aisnote
13 days ago
hi, samuel, I setup local newsblur on MacOs, but can not add url? could you give me some help?
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Underwater Caves Are Earth’s Final Frontier

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Visibility was so poor that Zachary Klukkert could barely see his hand in front of his face as he carefully swished the muck away from the skull of an extinct giant ruffed lemur. He was 40 feet underwater, diving deep below the surface of Aven Cave, an inland cavern in Madagascar. His headlamp cast a narrow beam, and after stirring up silt on the cave floor, the water had become so turbid he barely noticed the lemur's otherwise intact teeth were not the pearly white hue he had expected.

In the cave, Klukkert, a primatologist finishing his PhD at City University of New York, was surrounded by crocodile and lemur skeletons and couldn’t help but think about how well preserved this scene had remained for hundreds, if not thousands, of years.

In the 21st century, few corners of the earth remain unexplored. We’ve summited the highest mountains and plumbed the deepest depths of the oceans, yet underwater caves have retained centuries’ worth of secrets unknown to modern humans. The quality and quantity of skeletal remains found in Aven Cave—as well as remains recently discovered in other underwater caves in Madagascar, Mexico, and Hispaniola—have far surpassed that of anything previously found on land. This has been a boon for scientists studying primate evolution and the ancient world. Our early forays into these previously untouched environments in the past two decades has signaled a new age of exploration.

“When Edmund Hilary made the first ascent of Everest, he knew what was waiting for him at the top. There was no mystery,” says Phillip Lehman, diver and founder of the Dominican Republic Speleological Society, which helps organize research of underwater caves. Lehman has explored and mapped dozens of these previously uncharted caverns including Malaza Manga in Madagascar, perhaps the largest in the world. “In cave diving it’s the opposite. It’s completely a mystery. You have no idea what you’re getting into or what’s around the corner.”

In 2007, after three years of surveying nearly 100,000 feet of underwater passages near Tulum, Mexico, Venezuelan diver Alberto Nava and his team found and entered Hoyo Negro (Black Hole), a cave 200 feet in diameter and more than 100 feet deep. There they discovered the remains of an ancient female, approximately 12,000 year old, which are possibly the oldest of any human ever found in North America. They named her Naia. Her discovery could help shed light on when and where humans came to the Americas and how they evolved as a species. Since then, Nava and his team have continued to catalogue the cave’s contents and have found skeletons of extinct giant ground sloths, saber-toothed cats, and gomphotheres, an extinct species related to elephants.

Propelling these types of discoveries are advances in diving technology and techniques over the past two decades that have given us access to places previously unreachable. Better breathing systems allow divers to say underwater longer; stronger lighting has improved visibility; and subaquatic scooters and computers have enhanced mobility. We’re now able to study bacteria in the “blue holes” of the Bahamas, whose conditions mirror those of the oxygen-free environments where life first took hold on the planet 4 billion years ago. By studying these organisms, scientists hope to learn more about the possibilities of life on other planets. Elsewhere, researchers are looking to these caves to shed light on past climate change events to better predict future climatic shifts.

Underwater caves also give adventurers opportunities to push the limits of exploration. Polish diver Krysztof Starnawski explored Hranicka Popast in the Czech Republic for 17 years before confirming, in 2016, that it is the world’s deepest underwater cave (at 1,325 feet deep). This expedition was an all-out assault that required a large team, GIS mapping capabilities, high powered lights, and a Remotely Operated Underwater Vehicle (ROV) to make the final descent.

Though we don’t know how many virgin caves are out there, we continue to find new ones and push further into known ones as well. For example, Lehman and his team are mapping Malaza Manga in hopes of confirming its status as the world’s largest submerged cave. Canadian cave diver Jill Heinerth is leading unprecedented cold water dives through icebergs and submerged ice caves at both poles. Excursions are underway around the world.

“What we’re finding in these difficult-to-reach places are paleontological finds, geological discoveries, new species, so it’s pretty important in terms of scientific research and exploration,” says Rebecca Martin, senior director of National Geographic’s explorer program, which sponsored both Starnawski and Nava’s expeditions. “There is a whole unknown realm within the planet and we’re just breaking ground.”

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samuel
16 days ago
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Fascinating!
The Haight in San Francisco
lukeburrage
16 days ago
Also: super dangerous and deadly!
aisnote
14 days ago
hi, newsblur is so nice.
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Voluntary dining in hospitals

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Label this not The Department of Why Not but rather The Department of Why?

The Howsers are far from the only regulars at the Castle Creek Cafe, located inside Aspen Valley Hospital. It’s a popular breakfast spot for city workers. It also feeds people on both sides of the law; police officers visit daily, and the cafe delivers to inmates at the local jail 7 days a week. The cafe makes a point of welcoming community members with no hospital affiliation. And its menus, made available to view a month at a time, include items like herbed farro pilaf, corn soufflé, and panko crusted cod. We’re a long way away from institutional slop. [TC: speak for yourself, buster!]

The Howsers discovered the cafe, which Mary calls “the best kept secret in Aspen,” after having some tests done in the hospital. She says, “Never in my wildest dreams did I think hospital food could be tasty!” The experience has even inspired them to check out restaurants at other hospitals.

One Colorado hospital restaurant that should be next on their list is Manna, within Castle Rock Adventist Hospital.

I am sorry people, but I am going to stick with theory on this one.  No data will be sampled, unless you count this enthusiastic description from Tim Davis as evidence of sorts:

“Their menu has real gourmet style food you would expect from a high priced restaurant, but sold to you at a much more affordable price,” he says. One dish is maple glazed duck confit, consisting of a maple glazed duck leg served with swiss chard and spätzle, for $9. The grilled Thai cabbage steak, with marinated cabbage, spicy lime dressing, and shishito pepper, is even cheaper. Their burger buns even come adorned with a monogrammed M.

A further advantage is that the staff don’t push you out the door to leave, in addition the dining rooms are spacious and somber.

Mises was right about the a priori!

Here is the article, with further testimonials, and for the hat tip I thank Steve Rossi.

The post Voluntary dining in hospitals appeared first on Marginal REVOLUTION.

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samuel
17 days ago
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I always enjoyed eating the the university hospital's stunningly huge glass-ceiling atrium cafe when I was at Case Western in Cleveland. Food was just as good as any other cafeteria on campus, and it was a huuuuuge huge room. Photos: http://dewolff.com/?page_id=456
The Haight in San Francisco
satadru
15 days ago
The hospital cafe at the place I'm at now... not so good.
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The Matzo Project Proves Real Matzah Cannot Taste Good

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The Matzo Project Proves Real Matzah Cannot Taste Good Several years ago, I was excoriated in the Forward for declaring once in a Gothamist post that matzah "is in fact disgusting." Apparently this assertion made me some kind of race traitor. But I spent many years being force-fed this nightmarish "food" until I discovered, at the ripe old age of 14, that neither I nor my grandmother would be immediately struck by lightning if I ate bread on Passover. [ more › ]
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samuel
18 days ago
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Why somebody would eat matzah before Passover I will never understand.
The Haight in San Francisco
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