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15 Homemade Marshmallow Recipes That’ll Take Your S’mores to the Next Level

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Grab your chocolate and graham crackers!
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samuel
8 days ago
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As long as they leave out the gelatin (animal bones) I'm happy.
The Haight in San Francisco
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Ohio Restaurant Owner Shipped A Milkshake To Terminally Ill Woman In D.C.

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There are some things we do for the people we love, and then there are the things we do out of love for people we might not even know. Like the fine folks at an Ohio restaurant who helped deliver a milkshake to a terminally ill woman in Washington, D.C., yearning for a taste of home.

A friend of the woman wrote on Facebook this week that she only wanted two things before she died of pancreatic cancer: A Cleveland Indians hat — which he brought to her hospice bed the next day — and a mocha milkshake from Tommy’s Restaurant in Cleveland, in the neighborhood where she and her friend had grown up together.

A milkshake from a few states away is not so easily procured as a hat, however. He reached out the restaurant via email and asked if they could deliver to D.C. A few days later, he received a call from the owner, Tommy himself.

“’Yes. We will figure out a way to do this,’” he recalls Tommy telling him.

Soon after, Tommy shipped the woman a mocha shake, packed in dry ice.

“I would have even driven up there if I’d had to,” Tommy told The Washington Post.

“She was thrilled,” the woman’s friend wrote. “She shared it with her family. She talked about it for days and days. She shared the story with her friends back in Cleveland and here in the D.C. area. It was something that made everyone smile.”

She passed away last week, and her friend now wants others to know about the “caring and good heartedness of Tommy at Tommy’s.”

“So, my friends, if you are in Cleveland Heights, or anywhere near there, please stop in at Coventry, order one of those incredible milkshakes and ask for Tommy (he is the one cooking in the middle of the restaurant) and say, ‘This one is for Emily. Thank you for sending one to her.’”





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samuel
10 days ago
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Of course it was Tommys on Coventry. I grew up next to Tommys and took all my dates there.
The Haight in San Francisco
popular
12 days ago
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satadru
12 days ago
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New York, NY
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2 public comments
MaryEllenCG
12 days ago
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I'm not crying, YOU'RE crying.
Greater Bostonia
dori
12 days ago
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I've got a story that's just as good:

When Tom was dying, the one thing he really wanted was a steak from his favorite restaurant… which had closed two years earlier.

A hospice volunteer tracked down the restaurant owners, who cooked him a steak — just like they'd made at their restaurant — and personally delivered it to our home.

Everyone who contributed to this is an angel, imo.
Healdsburg, CA
MaryEllenCG
12 days ago
I'm sorry for your loss.

Bob Johnstone: Brilliant!: Shuji Nakamura And the Revolution in Lighting Technology, p 107

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Modifying the equipment was the key to his success... For the first three months after he began his experiments, Shuji tried making minor adjustments to the machine. It was frustrating work... Nakamura eventually concluded that he was going to have to make major changes to the system. Once again he would have to become a tradesman, or rather, tradesmen: plumber, welder, electrician -- whatever it took. He rolled up his sleeves, took the equipment apart, then put it back together exactly the way he wanted it. ...

Elite researchers at big firms prefer not to dirty their hands monkeying with the plumbing: that is what technicians are paid for. If at all possible, most MOCVD researchers would rather not modify their equipment. When modification is unavoidable, they often have to ask the manufacturer to do it for them. That typically means having to wait for serveral months before they can try out a new idea.

The ability to remodel his reactor himself thus gave Nakamura a huge competitive advantage. There was nothing stopping him; he could work as fast as he wanted. His motto was: Remodel in the morning, experiment in the afternoon. ...

Previously he had served a ten-year self-taught apprenticeship in growing LEDs. Now he had rebuilt a reactor with his own hands. This experience gave him an intimate knowledge of the hardware that none of his rivals could match. Almost immediately, Nakamaura was able to grow better films of gallium nitride than anyone had ever produced before.

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samuel
14 days ago
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Full stack
The Haight in San Francisco
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How to Have the Best Bonfire of the Summer

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Bonfires are pretty much a summer and early fall tradition. You might think they’re easy to throw together in a few minutes, but making a bit more effort will turn a mediocre bonfire gathering into one that you and your friends will fondly remember.

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samuel
27 days ago
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You can never have too much wood at a bonfire. Short on time? Just burn more.
The Haight in San Francisco
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Woman Flying Home To San Francisco Trapped In Barefoot 'Nightmare'

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Woman Flying Home To San Francisco Trapped In Barefoot 'Nightmare' The barefoot woman then used her unshod dog to open and close the plane's window cover. [ more › ]
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samuel
28 days ago
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Small world, Jessie helped design NewsBlur's blurblogs - http://samuel.newsblur.com.
The Haight in San Francisco
ChrisDL
28 days ago
1. unacceptable. 2. Just ask the feet to please not do that?
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Bluetooth LE Standard Gains Mesh Networking for Improved Smart Home Connectivity

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The Bluetooth Special Interest Group today announced that its Bluetooth technology has been updated with support for mesh networking, designed to create large-scale device networks by connecting multiple Bluetooth devices to one another.

Bluetooth calls these "many-to-many" connections, which can support just a handful of devices or up to thousands. In a home setting, the mesh feature will be useful for connecting smart home devices to one another to establish a network that spans an entire house, with no areas that are out of range.


Mesh networks are an improvement over single-point connections because a Bluetooth signal can be transmitted from device to device, reaching further distances. Some products, like the ZigBee-based Philips Hue line of lights, already use mesh networking techniques that are similar to what's being implemented today.

Bluetooth mesh also has many commercial uses, because it creates a reliable network with no single point of failure, it can scale to support thousands of nodes, it supports multi-vendor interoperability, and it offers industrial-grade security. Bluetooth SIG believes Bluetooth mesh will be essential for commercial building and factory automation.

"By adding support for mesh networking, the Bluetooth member community is continuing a long history of focused innovation to help new, up-and-coming markets flourish," said Mark Powell, executive director for Bluetooth SIG, Inc. "In the same way the connected device market experienced rapid growth after the introduction of Bluetooth Low Energy, we believe Bluetooth mesh networking can play a vital role in helping early stage markets, such as building automation and wireless sensor networks, experience more rapid growth."
Existing devices that support Bluetooth 4.0 or 5.0 can be updated with support for Bluetooth mesh, but implementing support requires a firmware update.

Bluetooth mesh networking specifications and the tools that qualify Bluetooth products with networking support are available on the Bluetooth Website. Bluetooth SIG told The Verge that it often takes approximately six months for manufacturers to adopt new Bluetooth technology, but mesh could start rolling out sooner because it doesn't require new hardware.

Tag: Bluetooth

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satadru
29 days ago
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Well this could be really interesting. Lots of questions about power usage, and how this mesh algorithm differs from other stuff out there... and whether this will potentially further clutter up the 2.4 GHz spectrum.
New York, NY
samuel
30 days ago
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RIP Zigbee and Z Wave. Good riddance to competing standards.
The Haight in San Francisco
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